Chris Masterjohn LITE talks about Getting Enough B12: Vegans, Omnivores, and Everyone In Between
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Although vitamin B12 is mostly found in animal products, there are true vegetarian and vegan sources. Nevertheless, designing a B12-adequate diet is more nuanced than it may seem even for someone with a healthy digestive system, because we can only absorb a limited amount from each meal. In this video, I teach you how to do exactly that for vegans, omnivores, and everyone in between.

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8 Comments

  1. I have seen alot of newer research indicating that B12 from seaweeds such as Nori is not a sufficient source of B12 and may actually contain B12 “analogues” that block true B12 absorption? Dear Chris it would be great to have an update on this if you have time? Thank you.
    Article with a summary of this:
    https://jacknorrisrd.com/vitamin-b12-in-nori/

  2. Dear Chris,

    My vitamin B12 levels are chronically elevated since the last 3 years. My folate levels are at top of the normal range or higher than normal as well. My other blood test ranges including liver and kidney function and c-reactive protein are normal.
    Could elevated B12 levels point towards a methylation cycle problem or functional deficiency or failure of cellular uptake? Could I be deficient in vitamin B12 and benefit from vitamin B12, p5p and methylfolate supplements? Thank you.
    Rosie

  3. I purchased your Testing Nutritional Status cheat sheet. I’m unclear on a couple things related to the B12 section.

    Serum B12 282 pg/mL
    ION Methylmalonate level of 0.2 mcg/mg creatine
    ION Homocysteine is 13.5 nmol/mL

    Is a serum level of 282 pg/mL B12 deficiency?
    Is Methylmalonate on the ION test the same as MMA?

    Just trying to reconcile what seems like a low B12 number with the “Methylmalonate” results on the ION test and an elevated homocysteine.

    Nothing on that panel indicated any biotin deficiency, or other disorders.

    1. The serum level looks very low to me.

      I don’t remember the ranges off the top of my head. You really should always, always, always include the ranges when you ask questions about data like this.

      Methylmalonate is the same as MMA.

      1. I purchased your Testing Nutritional Status cheat sheet. I’m unclear on a couple things related to the B12 section.

        Serum B12 282 pg/mL (Ref Range: 200-1100)

        ION Methylmalonate level of 0.2 mcg/mg (Ref Range: <= 2.3 mcg/mg)

        ION Homocysteine is 13.5 nmol/mL (Ref Range: 3.0 – 14.0 nmol/mL)

        Is a serum level of 282 pg/mL B12 deficiency?

        Just trying to reconcile what seems like a low B12 number with the “Methylmalonate” results on the ION test and an elevated homocysteine.

        Nothing on that panel indicated any biotin deficiency, or other disorders.

        Thank you very much for all you do

        1. Although the MMA is low, the other markers suggest poor B12 status.

          I would consult the cheat sheet’s biotin markers, because biotin deficiency could lower the MMA.

          I also think you should test whether raising the B12 level suppresses the homocysteine. If so, I would regard this as a case of B12 deficiency.

  4. This is pretty irresponsible, no plant foods have reliable amounts of active B12. If you’re referring to the 2012 Watanabe paper on mushrooms it’s important to note that the 100g is dry weight which is equivalent to 2 kg fresh mushrooms. Plus it is only one set of mushroom samples and as we are assuming they picked up the B12 from the soil, clearly that is not going to be consistent. Nori has inactive B12 analogues that are worse than nothing. The Yamada paper showed both dried and fresh nori to worsen subjects MMA levels. All vegans should be supplementing B12, period. All omnivores over 65 should as well, plus anyone who has ever been deficient, plus anyone who doesn’t want to eat meat 3 times a day apparently, which is a pretty inane thing to do just for the B12.

    1. Eating meat three times a day isn’t healthy. The Canadian food guide asserts a move to eating less meat is considered healthier. Meat eaters should be supplementing b12 regardless of age as well.

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