Showing: 7 - 12 of 24 Articles

Gary Taubes on Cherry-Picking and Paradigm Shifts (A Brief Thought on Science)

Warning: A Serious Blog Post Occurs Somewhere Below Some controversy recently erupted in the Twitter-sphere when a number of us including Dave Dixon and Dallas Hartwig were recently discussing Denise Minger’s angular hypothesis of atherosclerosis, in which she proposed that increased concentrations of serum bananas and increased concentrations of other plasma constituents with pointy ends or sharp edges penetrate the …

The Central Role of Thyroid Hormone in Governing LDL Receptor Activity and the Risk of Heart Disease

In “Genes, LDL-Cholesterol Levels, and the Central Role of LDL Receptor Activity in Heart Disease,” as well as my most recent presentations at Wise Traditions and AHS, I described the overwhelming genetic evidence for the theory that LDL receptor activity centrally governs the risk of heart disease and the large amount of other evidence from …

“The Masai: Introduction” and “A Glimpse of Gender, Sexuality, and Spirituality in the Loita Masai” Are Both Now Up and Working

Unfortunately my two most recent blog posts on the Masai blacked out over at Mother Nature Obeyed shortly after posting the second one.  But they are now up and running!  Theoretically, the site error is permanently fixed. Enjoy! The Masai: Introduction The Masai Part I: A Glimpse of Gender, Sexuality, and Spirituality in the Loita …

Genes, LDL-Cholesterol Levels, and the Central Role of LDL Receptor Activity In Heart Disease

Are high concentrations of LDL-cholesterol a major cause of heart disease?  If we are a proponent of the “lipid hypothesis,” we say yes.  If we are a “cholesterol skeptic,” we say no — total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL particles, triglycerides, and other blood lipids have little or nothing to do with heart disease. I believe both of these positions …

What Can Familial Hypercholesterolemia Mortality In the 19th Century Teach Us About Genetics?

by Chris Masterjohn Not much, simply because the data are so poor.  However, let’s take a look at some data for the very weakly supported hypothesis that people in the 19th century with familial hypercholesterolemia lived longer than other people and perform a little “thought experiment” to see what it could teach us about genetics if …